Radon Quick Facts

  • World's 2nd leading cause of lung cancer.
  • Cause of 15% of lung cancer worldwide.
  • Odorless and tasteless gas.
  • Caused by the decay of soil and water.

Pro Series 3 Certifications

EPA tested and evaluated, and meets EPA standards. EPA cannot certify this device because it is too unique to fit into any specific category.

Tested by Bowser-Morner – a multi-disciplined consulting engineering and analytical firm with the top radon testing laboratory in the country.

View the Bowser-Morner test results

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector FAQ's

  1. How soon can I get a reading?
  2. NEW! - What advice does the EPA have for consumers who have granite countertops?
  3. NEW! - Are the levels of radon in granite dangerous to humans or animals?
  4. NEW! - Does the EPA believe that there's radon in granite countertops?
  5. NEW! - Has the EPA done studies on radon in granite countertops?
  6. What are the differences between the Pro Series 2 and the Pro Series 3?
  7. How can I determine the level of harmful radioactive radon in my home or office?
  8. How does the Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector display the level of Radon Gas?
  9. When will I know if my home or office reaches an unsafe level of Radon? (approximately 4 pCi/L)
  10. How do I know that the Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector is working?
  11. How accurate is the Pro Series 3?
  12. Where do I need to place the unit?
  13. Can the alarm be turned off?
  14. If I unplug the unit or the power goes out will it reset the detector?
  15. What is the average life span (shelf life) of the Pro Series III?

General Radon FAQ's

  1. Definition of Radon
  2. Sources of Radon
  3. What are the Health Effects From Exposure to Radon?
  4. What is the Average Level of Radon Found in a Home?
  5. How do we know radon is a carcinogen?
  6. Who do I contact if I need radon-related repairs done or need a professional to test my home?

 


Pro Series III Radon Gas Detector FAQ's

Q: How soon can I get a reading?

A: You will get your first reading 48 hours after you plug the unit in. It then continues to sample the air and give you an updated reading every hour.

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Q: What advice does the EPA have for consumers who have granite countertops?

A: (Excerpts taken from the EPA Website - www.epa.gov)

"While natural minerals such as granite may occasionally emit radon gas, the levels of radon attributable to such sources are not typically high.  EPA believes the principal source of radon in homes is soil gas that is drawn indoors through a natural suction process.  To reduce radon risk you should first test the air in your home to determine the radon level."

Good Life® strongly recommends using the Pro Series 3 Radon Detector to test for Radon in your home.

"If your home has a high radon level, a level of 4 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L) of air or more, there are ways to mitigate or reduce the radon level in almost any home."

You may also contact your state radon office for assistance. 

"The key to reducing risk is to test your home for radon and then make decisions as appropriate."

Click here to read the EPA's Citizen's Guide to Radon.

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Q: Are the levels of radon in granite dangerous to humans or animals?

A: (Excerpt taken from the EPA Website - www.epa.gov)

"While radon levels attributable to granite are not typically high, there are simply too many variables to generalize about the potential health risks inside a particular home that has granite countertops. It is prudent to limit your family's exposure to radon whenever possible.  EPA recommends that indoor air have a radon level as far below 4 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L) of air as possible.  There are easy ways to test the air in your home for radon, and high radon levels can be reduced with proven and inexpensive technology.  EPA believes the most significant source of radon risk is soil gas. Regardless of source, all homes should be tested for radon."

Good Life® strongly recommends using the Pro Series 3 Radon Detector to test for Radon in your home.

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Q: Does the EPA believe that there's radon in granite countertops?

A: (Excerpt taken from the EPA Website - www.epa.gov)

"Granite is a natural mineral formed by earth's geology.  It is mined and used to produce commercial products such as countertops.  It is possible for any granite sample to contain varying concentrations of uranium that can produce radon gas.  Some granite used in countertops may contribute variably to indoor radon levels.  However, EPA has no reliable data to conclude that types of granite used in countertops are significantly increasing indoor radon levels."

"At this time, we do not have adequate data to determine the radiation risk to people from granite countertops. EPA will continue to monitor and analyze the research on this issue."

Good Life® strongly recommends using the Pro Series 3 Radon Detector to test for Radon in your home.

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Q: Has the EPA done studies on radon in granite countertops?

A: (Excerpt taken from the EPA Website - www.epa.gov)

"EPA is aware of a few studies that have conducted limited research on radon in granite countertops. EPA will continue to review this research.  The U.S. Surgeon General and EPA recommend that all homes be tested for radon in indoor air.  It's easy and inexpensive to test homes with do-it-yourself radon test kits that are commonly available at the retail level and on-line."

Good Life® strongly recommends using the Pro Series 3 Radon Detector to test for radon in your home.

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Q: What are the differences between the Pro Series 2 and the Pro Series 3?

A: On the Pro Series 3 they have added a decimal point in the reading. The decimal point is a major difference. The Pro Series 2 with out the decimal point would always round down to the closest whole number. So if the actual level of radon detected in the area was 3.9 it would read as 3 which makes for a less than accurate reading.

The Pro Series 3 has also added a short term alarm. The short term alarm will sound after 30 consecutive days of a reading of 4 pCi/L or higher.

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Q: How can I determine the level of harmful radioactive radon in my home or office?

A: Simply purchase our Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector and plug it in to any electrical outlet for the readings to appear. Within 48 hours you will have an reading to decipher if your living or office space is contaminated with toxic radon gas and take the appropriate action.

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Q: How does the Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector display the level of Radon Gas?

A: A numeric LED display range of 0 to 999 shows the level of radon gas in pCi/L on a short-term or long-term basis.

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Q: When will I know if my home or office reaches an unsafe level of Radon? (approximately 4 pCi/L)


A: Audible alarm sounds if the long-term average reaches 4 pCi/L or greater

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Q: How do I know that the Pro Series 3 Radon Gas Detector is working?

A: A self-test is conducted every 24 hours with an error code displayed if there is a failure.

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Q: How accurate is the Pro Series 3?

A: The Pro series 3 accuracy is +/- 20% or 1 pCi/L whichever is greater.

The Pro Series 3 has been tested by Bowser-Morner – a multi-disciplined consulting engineering and analytical firm with the top radon testing laboratory in the country.

Bowser-Morner Test Results (April, May, June 2004)

Test Samples Test Duration Relative Humidity Temperature Target Radon Level Average Relative Percent Error EPA Recommended Accuracy
25 120 hours 76% 70F 26.5 pCi/L -4.7% +/- 25%
25 121 hours 50% 70F 25.8 pCi/L 2.0% +/- 25%
25 120 hours 23% 70F 23.9 pCi/L 11.2% +/- 25%

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Q: Where do I need to place the unit?

A: The detector should be placed in the lowest living area where it will not be disturbed. It should be at least 3 feet from windows, doors, or any other potential openings in the exterior walls. Location of the detector should be at least 1 ft from the exterior wall and at least 20inchs from the floor. No other object should be placed within 4 inches of the detector.

Areas to avoid:

  • Near drafts caused by heating, ventilating, and air conditioning vents, doors, fans and windows.
  • Near excessive heat, such as fireplaces and direct sunlight, and areas of high humidity.
  • Near televisions, computers, radios, or other electrical equipment.
  • Near curtains, furniture, or other items that may inhibit the flow of air through the ventilation slots.
  • In general, the detector should not be located in Kitchens, Laundry rooms closets or Bathrooms.

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Q: Can the alarm be turned off?

A: Yes the alarm can be muted.

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Q: If I unplug the unit or the power goes out will it reset the detector?

A:No, this will not reset the detector. The unit will continuously sample the air and give you an average reading up to a 5yr time period. You would have to manually clear the unit's memory to reset it.

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Q: What is the average life span (shelf life) of the Pro Series III?

A:Yes. The average life span of the Pro Series III is 5yrs. The unit will store your readings up to 5 yrs continually sampling the air every hour and giving you and average reading to keep you safe year round.

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General Radon FAQ's

Q: Definition of Radon

A: Radon is a gaseous radioactive element having the symbol Rn, the atomic number 86, an atomic weight of 222, a melting point of -71ºC, a boiling point of -62ºC, and (depending on the source, there are between 20 and 25 isotopes of radon - 20 cited in the chemical summary, 25 listed in the table of isotopes); it is an extremely toxic, colorless gas; it can be condensed to a transparent liquid and to an opaque, glowing solid; it is derived from the radioactive decay of radium and is used in cancer treatment, as a tracer in leak detection, and in radiography

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Q: Sources of Radon

A: Earth and rock beneath home; well water; building materials.

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Q: What are the Health Effects From Exposure to Radon?

A: No immediate symptoms. Based on an updated Assessment of Risk for Radon in Homes, radon in indoor air is estimated to cause about 21,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States. Smokers are at higher risk of developing Radon-induced lung cancer. Lung cancer is the only health effect which has been definitively linked with radon exposure. Lung cancer would usually occur years (5-25) after exposure. There is no evidence that other respiratory diseases, such as asthma, are caused by radon exposure and there is no evidence that children are at any greater risk of radon induced lung cancer than adults.

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Q: What is the Average Level of Radon Found in a Home?

A: Based on a national residential radon survey completed in 1991, the average indoor radon level is 1.3 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in the United States. The average outdoor level is about 0.4 pCi/L.

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Q: How do we know radon is a carcinogen?

A: The World Health Organization (WHO), the National Academy of Sciences, the US Department of Health and Human Services, as well as EPA, have classified radon as a known human carcinogen, because of the wealth of biological and epidemiological evidence and data showing the connection between exposure to radon and lung cancer in humans.

There have been many studies conducted by many different organizations in many nations around the world to examine the relationship of radon exposure and human lung cancer. The largest and most recent of these was an international study, led by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which examined the data on 68,000 underground miners who were exposed to a wide range of radon levels. The studies of miners are very useful because the subjects are humans, not rats, as in many cancer research studies. These miners are dying of lung cancer at 5 times the rate expected for the general population. Over many years scientists around the world have conducted exhaustive research to verify the cause-effect relationship between radon exposure and the observed increased lung cancer deaths in these miners and to eliminate other possible causes.

In addition, there is an overlap between radon exposures received by miners who got lung cancer and the exposures people would receive over their lifetime in a home at EPA's action level of 4 pCi/L, i.e., there are no large extrapolations involved in estimating radon risks in homes.

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Q: Who do I contact if I need radon-related repairs done or need a professional to test my home?

A: If you are needing repairs done or need a professional to test your home you can contact your local State Radon Specialist.
Go to www.epa.gov/iaq/whereyoulive.html and click on your state to get contact information. Here they have a list of contractors in your area that can do repairs.

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